Casey Luskin Looks in Mirror, Fails to Recognize Self

Over at Evolution News & Views we have Luskin whining:

Today New York Times reporter Kirk Johnson totally misrepresented what I said in his article “Anti-Darwin Bill Fails in Utah.”

and later:

He put words in my mouth making it sound as if we were completely dismissive of the legislative and policy issues in Utah — on the contrary we followed this issue, even though we weren’t directly involved. He even admitted as much in an e-mail this morning asking for a correction.

and then there is this:

The sad thing here is that it seems that Johnson’s preconceived notions about reality affected journalism.

Yet Casey himself is not above doing the same thing when his “…preconceived notions about reality …” affected his (mis) interpretation of Erwin and Valentine’s paper.
Even Chimps can recognize themselves in the mirror says I.

MRSA and Amoebas

By now, most of us are familiar with MRSA or methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The staph bacteria is pretty common on human skin but doesn’t become a problem until it finds an entry through the flesh [afarensis had an old scar from a car accident get infected with staph, fortunately not MRSA, and spent about four days in the hospital last summer] at which point it becomes a problem. MRSA is mainly found in hospitals, although there have always been a number of cases where the person had never visited a hospital. Recent research may have uncovered why. According to Science Daily MRSA use amoeba to evade measures designed to halt their spread:

Scientists from the University of Bath have shown that MRSA infects and replicates in a species of amoeba, called Acanthamoeba polyphaga, which is ubiquitous in the environment and can be found on inanimate objects such as vases, sinks and walls.
As amoeba produce cysts to help them spread, this could mean that MRSA maybe able to be ‘blown in the wind’ between different locations.

Continue reading

MRSA and Amoebas

By now, most of us are familiar with MRSA or methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The staph bacteria is pretty common on human skin but doesn’t become a problem until it finds an entry through the flesh [afarensis had an old scar from a car accident get infected with staph, fortunately not MRSA, and spent about four days in the hospital last summer] at which point it becomes a problem. MRSA is mainly found in hospitals, although there have always been a number of cases where the person had never visited a hospital. Recent research may have uncovered why. According to Science Daily MRSA use amoeba to evade measures designed to halt their spread:

Scientists from the University of Bath have shown that MRSA infects and replicates in a species of amoeba, called Acanthamoeba polyphaga, which is ubiquitous in the environment and can be found on inanimate objects such as vases, sinks and walls.
As amoeba produce cysts to help them spread, this could mean that MRSA maybe able to be ‘blown in the wind’ between different locations.

Continue reading

A. V. Kidder, Charles Lindbergh and Pictures from Space

In early October of 1929 an unlikely team of people set out from Belize to look for Mayan ruins. The team was lead by A. V. Kidder – one of the most dominant figures in Americanist archaeology. Joining the team was Charles Lindbergh – yes, that’s right “Lucky Lindy” world famous aviator from Missouri. Lindbergh had become interested in the role of aviation in archaeology when he discovered several sights from the air – during his numerous travels. So he spent five days flying across the Yucatan with A. V. Kidder and William Van Dusen (A rep from Pan American Airways). Along the way they discovered some interesting sights. Unfortunately, the Lindbergh-Carnegie flights were quite crude in terms of methodology so the whole thing fell far short of initial expectations You can consult Flights Into Yesterday for more info. I was reminded of the above story by this story of the discovery of a Mayan ruin via the use of satellite data.

Octopus Killing a Shark

Martin Brazeau at The Lancelet has the video. Apparently, the octopus was moved into a shark tank and developed a regular habit of killing 3-4 foot sharks…

An Interesting Inovation On DNA Extraction from Fossil Bones: One From the Archives

This is another from the archives.
According to New Scientist an new technique has been developed to extract DNA from bones. Before going further a little background information is in order.

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Antifreeze Proteins and Larval Fish

Sea water freezes at -1.9C which presents a problem for any creature that wants to live in Arctic or Antarctic seas. Some species of fish have antifreeze proteins (AFP’s) that allow them to live in such environments. Such proteins bind to ice crystals and inhibit their growth. Consequently the freezing point of blood and body fluids in such fish is about 2 degrees below the freezing temperature of seawater. The best studied species of fish with AFP’s are the notothenioids which live in the Antarctic. Several of which are pictured below.
antarcticfishes_clip_image002_0001.gificefish.jpg

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