First There Was The Bible Code, Now There Is Plato’s Code

I’m not sure what to make of this especially because it is the first I have heard about a code in Plato’s work.
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Love Is The Answer!

Apropos; of the last paragraph herethere is this discourse on Love by Aristophanes from Plato’s Symposium:

Aristophanes professed to open another vein of discourse; he had a mind to praise Love in another way, unlike that of either Pausanias or Eryximachus. Mankind, he said, judging by their neglect of him, have never, as I think, at all understood the power of Love. For if they had understood him they would surely have built noble temples and altars, and offered solemn sacrifices in his honour; but this is not done, and most certainly ought to be done: since of all the gods he is the best friend of men, the helper and the healer of the ills which are the great impediment to the happiness of the race. I will try to describe his power to you, and you shall teach the rest of the world what I am teaching you.

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Gays in the Military: The Sacred Band Of Thebes

There is a big kerfluffle over repealing DADT. Republicans are against it, even though the military is for it. One is amused at the split in opinion between the two groups. At any rate, the Wall Street Journal is against it. Says Mackubin Ownes:

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A Couple of Things That Make You Say “Cool!”

Building Rome in a Day from the University of Washington (Hat Tip to Past Thinking). The University of Washington describes the project this away:
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The Parthenon and the Acropolis: A New Point of View

Well, it’s new to me anyway. Mostly, the Acropolis and Parthenon are viewed as stunning achievements of Greek art and architecture. Occasionally, Pericles is mentioned along with the propaganda aspects of the two structures. Bill Caraher, at The Archaeology of the Mediterranean World offers another take. The Acropolis and Parthenon as destroyers:

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The Shipwreck and the Temple of Apollo

National Geographic has an interesting story on a ~2,000 year old shipwreck off the coast of Kızılburun, Turkey. Among the cargo was a Doric column – well pieces thereof because columns were built in pieces – and part of the interest in the story is in figuring out the final destination of the Doric column. Equally of interest are some of the things being learned about the making of the column. It was quarried in Marmara Island.

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More News From The AAS Meetings: Fossil Fish Brain, Feathers, and Archimedes Does Infinity

From here which apparently covers a session on imaging techniques.

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