Mt. Lykaion and the Worship of Zeus

I don’t know how I missed this, but National Geographic has an interesting article concerning archaeological excavations at Mt. Lykaion – one of the birthplaces of Zeus (the other being Mt. Ida in Crete, but we know what Epimenides thought of the Cretans). According to the article, excavations reveal that sacrifices took place at Mt. Lykaion a full 1,000 years before Zeus made an appearance:

Continue reading

A Greek Legend Bites the Dust

According to Yahoo News recent research near Mt. Taygete indicates that the Spartans did not, in point of fact, throw sickly or deformed children off a cliff:

Continue reading

More Interesting News From the World of Ancient Greece

Archaeologists working at Midea – in the Argolid have discovered an underground passage thought to be an emergency source of water for the Mycenaean citadel. The passage dates to around the mid 13th century B.C. From MSNBC:

Continue reading

Jason and the Argonauts, the Golden Fleece, and Gold

Although most of the anthropology part of the blogosphere is buzzing over the paper on the gorilla, there was a second piece, in Nature, that I found interesting. In Fleece myth hints at golden age for Georgia Emiliano Feresin discusses recent research in Georgia (the country not the state) that discovered what may be the worlds oldest gold mine.

Continue reading

Noah? In Greek Art?

Bullsnit. I say that as someone who is quite fond of ancient Greek sculpture and has more than a few books on the subject. Unless you consider the picture below to be a good representation of Noah:

Continue reading

Mycenaean Grave Discovered

According to Reuters a Mycenaean grave has been discovered near the town of Agrinio:

Continue reading

Sigh, Why Couldn’t it Have Been Athens?

According to Science Daily Rome, circa 320 AD, has been rebuilt using advanced digital technology, laser scanners and such:

Continue reading